I argue elsewhere that general memory plays a central role in not only the human mind, but the brain as well. Thus a definition would be beneficial. In my view a general memory is, from a first person subjective view, a range of similar experience. For example, consider the memory “apple.” This is an object commonly experienced by people. “Apple” is known to be comprised of a range of color/size/shape combinations, tactile feelings (on hand, teeth, and mouth), tastes, thoughts (fruit, snack, grows on trees), intentions (grasp, take…

Consistent with a materialist philosophy, the neuroscience literature on memory often implies memory is a brain process first, and secondly a subjective phenomenon. The subjective aspects of memory take a back seat to the physical. Moreover, the contents of memory are seldom acknowledged or talked about. Subjective contents are seldom described in the literature in any detail. Analysis of specific memories are rare. The problem is this materialist approach has failed to provide a clear understanding of what human memory is — either from a third person neural…

The problem that arguably impedes the brain science progress the most is the lack of a brain theory. As Jeff Hawkins often says, neuroscience is “data rich and theory poor.” How does the brain create, represent, compute, process or mediate cognition, and the rest of the mind? How is the mind — perception, recognition, meaning, thought, emotion, executive control, goals, attention, intention, language, motor control etc. — manifest inside the brain? There has been surprisingly little progress made on this problem. How the neocortex works is still a…

As an event in one’s life is experienced — seen, heard, felt, recognized, understood etc. — what happens next? However the event might be later “processed,” it is first and foremost stored as a memory. I invite the reader to perform a simple experiment. Grasp an object and drop it on a surface. Maybe you let a pen fall onto a desk or the floor. Do you remember what the object felt like? It’s texture and weight? How fast it fell? The sound it made upon striking the…

What are mental states and processes? What is the human mind? I define it — from a first person subjective viewpoint — as a person’s experience and capabilities: perception (vision, somatosensation, pain/pleasure…), recognition, meaning, thought, emotion, state of arousal, motivation, the self, understanding, goals (long, medium, and short term), executive control, attention, intention, working memory, language, learning, motor control etc. The (conscious and unconscious) mind carries a tremendous amount of information. All of the components listed above — in addition to many others — can occur simultaneously during…

My company Mind Brain Insights is based on a new way to define the mind and map it to the brain, called the MA (Memory Activation) Method. The core idea is mind = (mostly) a set of general memories, based on past experience. For example, the intention “reach for my phone” is comprised of visual and somatosensory memories: such as “my arm & hand,” “reach forward” and “phone.” Associated memories might include “grasp,” “type a text,” and “feeling mildly excited.” Any common state of mind = a set…